New cell-on-chip technology improves allergy diagnostics

Avdelare1440px51

The device, a cellular easy-to-use chip, will significantly add health economic values due to improved capacity to objectively diagnose and monitor personalized treatments of allergic patients.

Allergic diseases are common and the prevalence has increased the last century. The interest in the basophil has gained much interest since new data indicate an important role in inflammation. Moreover, biological pharmaceuticals that target basophil function have entered the market. Thus, a method for an accurate point-of-care test of basophil function is greatly needed. We have for more than decade established expertise in the field of cellular methods for clinical use. We have shown that flow cytometric analyses of basophils (CD-sens) are very useful in the diagnostics/treatment of allergic patients. Our CD-sens method is now in clinical use and available at Swedens six university laboratories. However, it requires expensive flow cytometers and extensive manual labour skills. Development of a cellular easy-to-use chip that measure basophil activity would greatly enhance the possibility to perform the analysis at the point-of-care. The current method is mainly used by allergologists but the new chip device will expand the use also to other health care givers.

This project is collaboration between Karolinska Institutet, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Karolinska University Laboratory and Sach’s Children and Youth Hospital to develop a device based on cell-on-chip technology. The device will significantly add health economic values due to improved capacity to objectively diagnose and monitor personalized treatments of allergic patients by making the analyses more accessible, cost-effective and to be done at the point-of- care.

 

 

AnnaNoppSchermanChip738px580

ABOUT THE PROJECT

Project leader Anna Nopp Scherman, Karolinska institutet anna.nopp@ki.se

Funding from SWElife 2 OOO OOO SEK

Call for proposal SWElife spring 2015 call, for proposals for collaborative innovation projects within non-communicable diseases

About the project at Vinnova (in Swedish)